The America’s Cup Starts Doing Some Marketing. 9


With about 8 weeks to go, the America’s Cup have started to do some marketing. The Cup has a shiny new heavy metal inspired logo and a grainy, grunge video to inspire new audiences to get to Cascais to watch the boats compete.

But while the logo is bold and black and silver, the call to action is less confident.

“Sailing? You may like it now.”

How very… polite. Millions of bucks to create a shiny new sport and the pitch is not the Californian brashness that we are used to from brands like Apple, but more like a whimpering plea to pay attention.

The message is a little – ‘Excuse Mr (this is an ad aimed at men) Soccer fan and Mr F1 fan, would you mind terribly switching the channel over. We know that you have years of preconceptions about sailing, but we’ve made it better and you might like it, but we understand if you don’t. Have a nice day.’

Not one name is mentioned in the video, which features a looped set of soundbites, but the introduction features a set of blokes who want you to know that is not just another catamaran event – this is the America’s Cup.

The PR that goes with the new campaign is a little more confident. It says:

…the America’s Cup World Series is set to become the stage for nothing less than a transformation of sailing. …If you’re fortunate enough to be there in person, the racing will take place just metres from the shoreline. But if you’re not, don’t worry. Major advances in the television and web coverage of the sport, tested during the trials in Auckland, mean watching the America’s Cup has never been more compelling.

You will see and hear all of the action, as it’s unfolding, from multiple angles on board the boats. Revolutionary graphics technology will make the fast-paced action easy to understand. This is sailing from the inside out.

The best sailors on the fastest boats. That’s the promise. Now see it delivered.

Delivery of course will be the key. What do you think of the video?

More America’s Cup News

  • Cam

    looking better all the time!

  • Too long and at the end boring. To compare to the new video ad produced by IMG for Volvo Ocean Race. Again we do not care about techno at this step. 
    It’s all about engagement and close contact on speed sailing boats. All else is nonsense and out of purpose. 

  • Too long and at the end boring. To compare to the new video ad produced by IMG for Volvo Ocean Race. Again we do not care about techno at this step. 
    It’s all about engagement and close contact on speed sailing boats. All else is nonsense and out of purpose. 

  • Too long and at the end so boring. To compare with the new IMG video ad for Volvo Ocean Race. 

  • Too long and at the end so boring. To compare with the new IMG video ad for Volvo Ocean Race. 

  • For the Cup it’s all about engagement and close contact on the fastest boats of the world. 
    That’s the point, all else is nonsense and has no value. 

  • Lynn

    I have a slow Internet connection. The commercial paused to spool at some interesting spots – a wake in the foreground and Auckland’s skyline in the background.  I didn’t have the opportunity to hear what former Team New Zealand sailors such as Craig Monk and Kevin Hall had to say.  The next time the commercial paused the frame was a logoed up ETNZ catamaran.  As I thought about whether the ACEA has figured out a formula that would make anyone interested in purchasing the TV rights, the commercial continued and froze on ETNZ far ahead of Oracle Racing Team.  The next pause was pixels of TV noise.
     
    PJ Montegomery had the chance to say, “This is where we start to get serious.”

    Guys dancing across trampoline, men overboard and Genny Tulloch setting up an career alternative should the Olympics not pan out.

    It’s time to get serious.

    If the America’s Cup is going to sail into a new era, it should consider history and what made Newport, Fremantle, Auckland and Valencia successes.  The 34th America’s Cup can still generate the economic impact numbers that were sold to San Francisco, but not under the bill of goods that were negotiated under the quick to leave town mayor and his point people.  The America’s Cup can represent global economic development.  If they don’t understand it, they should figure out their exit strategy.  Teams, individuals and venues will continue to bail on the America’s Cup if the ACEA doesn’t get its foundational and competitive strategy right.

  • Very kewl video!

  • sail marketing

    all pretty lame…the faces chosen are not marketable to the  “facebook generation”…still looks and feels like any other gentlemen’s sport